Anatomy Psychology

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AnatomyPsychology

Theclip is important because it describes how action potentials causemuscle contraction which is essential for movement. From the clip, aperson can note that the movement of the action potential results inthe movement of the calcium ions which initiate the formation ofcross bridges that result in muscle contraction (Action Potential andMuscle Contraction). Anatomy psychology is an important topic as muchas understanding organ systems are their respective movements areconcerned. Nursing profession requires an individual not only to beknowledgeable to have a broad understanding of the processes thattake place in the organ system. The knowledge gained from this topiccan enable a person pursuing a nursing career to explain clearlyfactors that influence the processes such as muscle contraction topatients. It can also enable the nurse to relate some complicationswith the processes associated with muscle contraction. For instance,the clip on “Action Potentials and Muscle Contraction” explainsclearly the mechanisms associated with the contraction of themuscles. Without a clear understanding of the processes that initiatethe muscle contraction, a nurse can experience difficulties inexplaining the reason behind the movement.

Thetopic “” will assist me to explain the causesof some disorders. For instance, I will manage to explain problemsassociated with the movement since I understand all the stages thatbring about movement. Difficulties in movement can be as a result ofneuromuscular system disorders. With the knowledge gained from thetopic, a nurse can diagnose loss of normal functions from theclinical expression of specific symptoms. Therefore, the topic“” is important to a person pursuing nursingprofession because the knowledge gained can assist in identifying aswell as explaining causes of some complications.

Reference

ActionPotential and Muscle Contraction. Retrieved from http://highered.mheducation.com/sites/0072495855/student_view0/chapter10/animation_ _action_potentials_and_muscle_contraction.html