Death Penalty

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DeathPenalty

DeathPenalty

DEATHPENALTY RESEARCH OUTLINE

Themeanings of the death sentence are provided from various sources.Death penalty involves the execution of a person who has beenconvicted legally for engaging in a capital crime.

  1. HISTORY OF DEATH PENALTY

Thedeath sentence concept was borrowed from the United Kingdom duringthe colonial period in America. Opposition to the death penalty beganduring the early 1700s in the United States.

  1. DEATH PENALTY PROCESS

Theprocess has three areas: determining crimes that attract the deathsentence, initiating a judicial trial, and pursuing appeals.

  1. CONTINUING CONCERNS

Thedeath sentence has a majority approval rate in the United States.This is because of strong beliefs in deterrence or retribution.

  1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

TheUnited States Supreme Court has a consensus that certain groups ofpeople should not be executed for example, juveniles and people withmental illness.

  1. CONCLUSION

TheAmerican death penalty system is ineffective because of racialprejudice, error convictions, limited funding, and incompetent legalrepresentatives.

AnnotatedBibliography

Canes-Wrone,B., Clark, T. S., &amp Kelly, J. P. (2014). “Judicial selectionand death penalty decisions.” American Political Science Review,108(01), 23-39.

Thearticle explains the meaning of death penalty. It is a form ofcapital punishment that involves killing a convicted person. Thepunishment is provided by law in the judicial system of variousstates in the USA.

Hans,V. P., Blume, J. H., Eisenberg, T., Hritz, A. C., Johnson, S. L.,Royer, C. E., &amp Wells, M. T. (2015). “The :Should the Judge or the Jury Decide Who Dies?” Journal ofEmpirical Legal Studies, 12(1), 70-99.

Thearticle creates a debate about the authority that provides the deathpenalty. It is the responsibility of the state governments and thejudicial system to develop policies and laws regarding the deathpenalty.

Hood,R., &amp Hoyle, C. (2015). The death penalty: A worldwideperspective. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Thearticle provides an explanation about the handling of the deathpenalty in various countries for example, the United States and theUnited Kingdom. The United Kingdom abolished death sentence formurder crimes. Capital punishment is practiced in some Americanstates for example, Texas and California.

Levinson,J. D., Smith, R. J., &amp Young, D. M. (2014). “Devaluing death:An empirical study of implicit racial bias on jury-eligible citizensin six death penalty states.” NYUL Rev., 89, 513.

Thearticle provides evidence on racial bias by the judicial system whenproviding capital punishment. In American history, colored suspectshave been sentenced to death without sufficient evidence.

Lieberman,J. D., Shoemaker, J., &amp Krauss, D. A. (2014). “The effects ofmortality salience and evidence strength on death penalty sentencingdecisions.” Psychology, Crime &amp Law, 20(3), 199-221.

Thedeath sentence should be provided using strong evidence. Thejudicial system should be managed properly to prevent errors andmistakes during the trail process of capital offenders. Competentlegal representatives should be used to enhance the delivery ofaccurate punishment for capital offenders.

Magnus,A., Heen, M., &amp Lieberman, J. D. (2013). “Death and Politics:The Role of Demographic Characteristics and Testimony Type in DeathPenalty Cases Involving Future Dangerousness Testimony.” GraduateResearch Symposium, University of Nevada.

Thedeath sentence in the United States is heavily influenced bypolitics. Some states oppose the death sentence for example, NewJersey. Other states support capital punishment for instance, Texasand California.

Schaefer,L., &amp Radelet, M. L. (2016). “Have Mercy: New Opportunities forCommutations in Cases.” Hum. Rts., 42, 18.

Thearticle illustrates the increasing pressure by civil society andpolitical groups to abolish the death penalty because it isuncivilized and expensive. The death punishment is against the UnitedStates Constitution that protects the freedom of life of all people.

Vanden Haag, E., &amp Conrad, J. P. (2013). The death penalty: Adebate. Berlin: Springer Science &amp Business Media.

Thearticle discusses the controversial nature of the death penalty,internationally. Attitudes about the death sentence are changing. Thediscussion revolves around the civility of the deaths sentence andthe fairness of the court proceedings.

References

Canes-Wrone,B., Clark, T. S., &amp Kelly, J. P. (2014). “Judicial selectionand death penalty decisions.” AmericanPolitical Science Review,108(01), 23-39.

Hans,V. P., Blume, J. H., Eisenberg, T., Hritz, A. C., Johnson, S. L.,Royer, C. E., &amp Wells, M. T. (2015). “The :Should the Judge or the Jury Decide Who Dies?” Journal of Empirical Legal Studies,12(1), 70-99.

Hood,R., &amp Hoyle, C. (2015). Thedeath penalty: A worldwide perspective.Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Levinson,J. D., Smith, R. J., &amp Young, D. M. (2014). “Devaluing death:An empirical study of implicit racial bias on jury-eligible citizensin six death penalty states.” NYULRev.,89, 513.

Lieberman,J. D., Shoemaker, J., &amp Krauss, D. A. (2014). “The effects ofmortality salience and evidence strength on death penalty sentencingdecisions.” Psychology,Crime &amp Law, 20(3), 199-221.

Magnus,A., Heen, M., &amp Lieberman, J. D. (2013). “Death and Politics:The Role of Demographic Characteristics and Testimony Type in DeathPenalty Cases Involving Future Dangerousness Testimony.” GraduateResearch Symposium,University of Nevada.

Schaefer,L., &amp Radelet, M. L. (2016). “Have Mercy: New Opportunities forCommutations in Cases.” Hum.Rts.,42, 18.

Vanden Haag, E., &amp Conrad, J. P. (2013).The death penalty: A debate.Berlin: Springer Science &amp Business Media.