New Testament Exegesis

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New Testament Exegesis 7

NewTestament Exegesis

Professor’s

NewTestament Exegesis

Aparable can be considered as an illustrative story whereby a familiaridea is told alongside an unfamiliar idea in a manner that thecomparison assists people to grasp better and understand theunfamiliar concept. As a result, a simple story is narrated, andcertain features are presented of which are parallel to theprinciples one desire to drive home. For instance, a parable thattalks about a blind man leading another blind man implies that a manwith shortcomings cannot help others to correct theirs. Hence, themain aim of the research paper is to identify a parable in the bookof Mathew and give its exposition.

BlockQuotation

Theparable that will be handled in the project is obtained from the bookof Mathew 13:31-32 and it is the mastered seed and some aspect ofthe yeast. 31Heinformed the people about an additional parable: “The kingdomof heaven is like a mustard seed, which a man took and planted inhis field. 32Thoughit is the smallest of all seeds, yet when it grows, it is thelargest of garden plants and becomes a tree, so that the birds come and perch in its branches.” This parable is very elaborate inmeaning primarily to the Christian life.1

Structureof the Parable

Inthe statement, there is the comparison between the kingdom of heavenand the mastered seed. This comparison is very significant in thescriptures because according to the understanding of men the kingdomof heaven is perceived to be very big. On the other hand, in thatperiod the mustard seed that Jesus talked about was the tiniest ofall the seed known.2The other section gives the aspect of planting, and this tells us howwe can grow our faith in the Lord. Similarly, is shows how the faithdevelops and it becomes larger to the extent that it can benefitother people. Therefore, for us to seek the kingdom of heaven ourfaith must grow however small it is. The kingdom of heaven becomeslarger if only our faith can help other to turn away from theirsinful acts.3

LiteraryContext of the Parable

Inthis particular parable of the mustard seed, the people were beingtold about the smallest seed that when planted have the capacity togrow and become a huge tree. From the parable, there was a directcomparison between the heavenly kingdom and the seed. After that, thepeople took a step and planted the seed in the field. Additionally,of all the known seeds, the mustard seed was the smallest but when iteventually grew it become the largest tree in the garden. Once thetree grew, and the branches are strong, it created a place of refugefor the birds, and they could easily perch and have rest.4

Pointsof Reference within the Parable

Inthe context of the mustard seed as a parable, there are many pointsof references, for instance, the sower was Jesus himself, and He wasthe planter who comes to atone the sins of the world with the mainaim of making it fruitful. Secondly, mustard seed was the smallestseed known during that time, and it can grow to a height of tenfeet.5Therefore, the gospel is represented by the mustard seed, which has atiny beginning but can grow and reach millions of people through theworld. Where the mustard seed is grown represents the individuals whowill receive Jesus Christ and inherit the kingdom of God. Additionally, when Jesus started His ministry on earth, He had a fewpeople who helped Him to spread the word. Currently, the kingdom ofheaven that was being talked about has become big, and many peopleare getting refuge from it.6

MainPoint of the Parable

Themain point that is contained in the story of the seed is about thegrowth and expansion of the kingdom of God. The parable has twoaspects. First, it explains the kingdom of God all over the world,and on the other dimension it narrows down on a personal level whereit explains the kingdom of God with each believer. This parable wastold to the Jewish, and God’s had already chosen them as Hispeople. God had promised the people throughout the years that He wasgoing to send a Savior to them. Since man is limited inunderstanding, they misunderstood what was meant. In theirunderstanding, they anticipated that God would send an earthly kingto rescue them from the then Roman government. That was not theintention of God they sent a savior who delivered them from theirwon sin.7

OriginalIntent of the Parable

Theoriginal intent of the parable of the mustard seed was to teach thethen and the present people with regards to the heavenly kingdom ofGod. Everything about God’s kingdom is subjected to growth anddevelopment. One a person has received the work of God it is theirresponsibility to ensure they nature it, however, small it is, and itwill eventual grow and help other people.8Additionally, the people were being taught on how they can work ontheir faith and ensure that it grows for their benefit. Moreover,there is a genesis of everything in life, and its continuationgreatly depends on how human being works on it. For instance, if webelieve that the word of God has the power to change our life thenthat is what it will exactly do.9

Applicationof the Text to the Church Today

Fromthe parable of the mustard seed, everyone needs to realize people arepart and parcel of God’s kingdom. Similarly, the church is thekingdom that was being referred to, and it must take theresponsibility of spreading the gospel in every part of the world.The church acts as the buds of a massive plant that reproduce morebranches to enlarge the kingdom go God. Therefore, the people who arethe church are used to spread the kingdom of God. The people shouldcontinue with the work of spreading the gospel to homes, school andeverywhere around the world. The mustard plant continues to grow andgrow, and that calls for spreading the gospel by the church to ensurethat the kingdom of God continues until Jesus returns.10

Conclusion

Thestory of the mustard seed is among numerous parables that were toldin the book of Mathew. It also opens the eyes of the believers andtries to imagine how the mustard plant together with its flowers,leaves, and branches are hidden into the tiny seed. This tells usthat when we put trust in God, then all the good things are hiddeninside of our life because the spirit of God is inside us. Therefore,through god’s grace and mercy, the little things that are hiddeninside us began to grow small by small, and it can take years, butthe kingdom will continue to grow.

Bibliography

Handman,Courtney. &quotFigures of history: Interpreting Jewish pasts inChristian Papua New Guinea.&quot HAU:Journal of Ethnographic Theory6, no. 1 (2016): 237-260.

Mikić,A. (2016). Reminiscences of the cultivated plants early days astreasured by ancient religious traditions: the mustard crop (Brassicaspp. and Sinapis spp.) in earliest Christian and Islamic texts.GeneticResources and Crop Evolution,63(1),1-6.

Miranda,Mario J. &quotEngaging with Scripture Naysayers in their OwnVernacular: Proffering the Kingdom of Heaven.&quot Journalof Sociology and Christianity6, no. 2 (2016).

Moore,Thomas. TheBook of Matthew: A New Translation with Commentary—JesusSpirituality for Everyone.Vol. 1. SkyLight Paths Publishing, 2016.

Tough,Alistair G. &quotThinking about and working with archives andrecords: a personal reflection on theory and practice.&quot Archivesand Records37, no. 2 (2016): 225-238.

1  Thomas Moore. The Book of Matthew: A New Translation with Commentary—Jesus Spirituality for Everyone. Vol. 1. SkyLight Paths Publishing, 2016.

2  Courtney Handman. &quotFigures of history: Interpreting Jewish pasts in Christian Papua New Guinea.&quot HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory 6, no. 1 (2016): 237-260.

3  Thomas Moore. The Book of Matthew: A New Translation with Commentary—Jesus Spirituality for Everyone. Vol. 1. SkyLight Paths Publishing, 2016.

4  Mario J Miranda. &quotEngaging with Scripture Naysayers in their Own Vernacular: Proffering the Kingdom of Heaven.&quot Journal of Sociology and Christianity 6, no. 2 (2016).

5  Thomas Moore. The Book of Matthew: A New Translation with Commentary—Jesus Spirituality for Everyone. Vol. 1. SkyLight Paths Publishing, 2016.

6  Alistair G. Tough. &quotThinking about and working with archives and records: a personal reflection on theory and practice.&quot Archives and Records 37, no. 2 (2016): 225-238.

7  A, Mikić (2016). Reminiscences of the cultivated plants early days as treasured by ancient religious traditions: the mustard crop (Brassica spp. and Sinapis spp.) in earliest Christian and Islamic texts. Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution, 63(1), 1-6.

8  Mario J Miranda. &quotEngaging with Scripture Naysayers in their Own Vernacular: Proffering the Kingdom of Heaven.&quot Journal of Sociology and Christianity 6, no. 2 (2016).

9  A, Mikić (2016). Reminiscences of the cultivated plants early days as treasured by ancient religious traditions: the mustard crop (Brassica spp. and Sinapis spp.) in earliest Christian and Islamic texts. Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution, 63(1), 1-6.

10  Courtney Handman. &quotFigures of history: Interpreting Jewish pasts in Christian Papua New Guinea.&quot HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory 6, no. 1 (2016): 237-260.