San Giorgio Maggiore, Venice, Italy Part I

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SanGiorgio Maggiore, Venice, Italy

PartI

AnnotatedBibliography

RobertAdam.&nbspClassicalArchitecture.London: Penguin Books, 1990. ISBN 0-670-82613-8. NA260.A26 1990.Print.

RobertAdam discusses the concepts of Classical architecture from a wideangle. He addresses the works of several architects of the time,paying close attention to a number of their works, and how the piecesfit in the classical style. The source was useful in explaining thework of Palladio from a historical perspective. It also contributedas a resource for the elevation drawing for the building (Adam 133).

RogerH. Clark and Michael Pause.&nbspPrecedentsin Architecture.New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1985. ISBN 0-442-21668-8. LC84-3543. NA2750.C55 1984. Print.

Clarkand Pause, the course material, was very helpful in handling thepaper requirements ass it gave examples of base drawings fordifferent architecture. Besides offering information on the work ofPalladio amongst other architects, the authors were resourceful inthe elevation drawing, plan drawing, and section drawing, (Clark andPause 90).

JamesStevens Curl.&nbspClassicalArchitecture: An introduction to its vocabulary and essentials, witha select glossary of terms.New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1992. ISBN 0-442-30896-5. NA260.C87.Print.

CurlJames contributed the exterior photo of entry facade (64, 102) to theresearch. Besides, the paper borrowed information on the significanceof the San Giorgio Maggiore church in its historical context.

Fresina,Katherine. “Palladio’s religious architecture in Venice.”LouisianaState University.2012. Web.

Inthis peer reviewed scholarly article, Fresina sets out to study thearchitecture of Venice. She pays close attention to Palladio Andrea,starting out with his bibliography and a list of his works. Thearticle was useful in the spatial analysis of the church as well asthe historical context and significance of the work.

BaseDrawings

PlanDrawing

SitePlan Building

SectionDrawing

SectionDrawing

ElevationDrawing

ElevationBuilding

PartII

History

SanGiorgio Maggiore forms a part of the Benedictine monastery on theIsland of San Giorgio. It is a reflection of a refined classicism ofthe third quarter of the 16thCentury Roman era. Andrea Palladio is the Italian architectresponsible for the creation of the San Maggiore building. Thischurch construction of the bearing masonry system takes after theItalian Renaissance style of architecture. The building dates back tothe year 1560, when the construction begun, to the year 1580.However, the church was completed in 1610, after the death ofPalladio Andrea. Nevertheless, the design suggested by Palladio wasused to complete the project.

SpatialAnalysis

Palladiodesigned the church on an urban Island and a waterfront. Themagnificent construction is the face of Venice town, with a centraltemple front that comprises of high pedestal three-quarter compositecolumns. On the other hand, the back plane reflects the church’slower body, which comprises of pilasters and half pediments. Palladiomanaged to produce a sculptural feature of cornices, capitals,figures, and niches. The result is a glorious interaction of dark andlight during the day.

Asthe photograph illustrates, enough light gets into the church andreflects off the white undecorated wall to form a massive brightness.

Thebuilding reflects the Renaissance era in that its interior plan has aresolution of elements of centralized and longitudinal buildings. The plane accommodates side chapels as well as the inner room of naveto symbolize the medieval tradition of sacrament celebration andlarge congregations. Moreover, the inner ceiling comprises of alongitudinal barrel crypt with arches and columns to offer asupporting pillar for the lantern-lit dome. One cannot miss theharmony in the geometry that Palladio employs through the powerfularcs and verticals.

HistoricalSignificance

Historically,Palladio designed the church as a reflection of the Veneto pridethrough its aristocratic magnificence. The result was anarchitectural statement that influenced architects across NorthernEurope for over two centuries. This is probably due to his ingenuityin creating a design with a Renaissance concealment to theconventional basilica-plan elevation. To-date, Venice is home tosome of the most marvellous buildings in history. The contributingfactors include Venice’s culture, topography, and mercantiletraditions. For instance, building the church on an Island is areflection of the love the ancient Venetia had for its waters.

WorksCited

Adam,Robert.&nbspClassicalArchitecture.London: Penguin Books, 1990. ISBN 0-670-82613-8. NA260.A26 1990.Print.

Clark,Roger. and Michael Pause.&nbspPrecedentsin Architecture.New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1985. ISBN 0-442-21668-8. LC84-3543. NA2750.C55 1984. Print.

Curl,James Stevens.&nbspClassicalArchitecture: An introduction to its vocabulary and essentials, witha select glossary of terms.New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1992. ISBN 0-442-30896-5. NA260.C87.Print.

Fresina,Katherine. “Palladio’s religious architecture in Venice.”LouisianaState University.2012. Web.