Subject

  • Uncategorized

Shouldvideo game violence be censored?

Humanshave naturally been aggressive for as far back as history can betraced, wars and senseless violence have always been in existence.However, never in our historical existence have we ever bottled theseforms of violence in our entertainment. Today things have changed,and with graphically intense video games, children are now able tomake wars, murder and even rape and gets away with it as nobodybothers or pays attention to it. It is devastating and wreaking havocon the behaviors and emotions of our children. Violentvideo games lead to violent and aggressive behaviors, and theauthorities should censor the intensity of violence in these games.The effect of video games is far-reaching that one would imagine.Women are in most cases perceived as helpless victims and are throwninto these games as male fodders.

Videogames have been in existence for more than 30 years, and theirinfluence and negative impact has kept on escalating with time (&quotTheImpact Of Video Games | Media Information For Parents&quot). Thereis also the need for responsible parents to pay attention to therating of these games and if possible avoiding any form of a gamethat has a sense of violence. Video games allow players to becomepart of the game and with the increased level of sophistication,players now engage on a deeper physical and emotional level than everbefore(Ferenstein, Gregory).This is now a contributing factor to school bullying and shooting inour schools, not forgetting increased teenage sex and drug use. Thisdoes mean that children were angels before video games, but thesubstantial effect of these games is very high leading to childrenengaging in more violent and dangerous behaviors than before. Thecorrelation is so vivid that ignoring the causation is to beintentionally ignorant.

Videogame is a form of art a tool of free expression, but theultra-violent video games should not have a place in our society.While they can have positive effect such as inducing creativity butthey can also influence sociopathic behaviours in our children. Thisis why authorities should consider censoring the intensity ofviolence in these games to enhance a positive generation.

WorkCited

Ferenstein,Gregory. &quotViolent Video Games Do Cause Some Violence, ButCensorship Won’T&nbspHelp&quot. Techcrunch,2017,https://techcrunch.com/2012/12/20/violent-video-games-do-cause-some-violence-but-censorship-wont-help/.

&quotTheImpact Of Video Games | Media Information For Parents&quot.Pamf.Org,2017,http://www.pamf.org/parenting-teens/general/media-web/videogames.html.

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AnnotatedBibliography on Two Storied Building

Albrecht,Donald.&nbspTheWork of Charles and Ray Eames: A Legacy of Invention.Harry N. Abrams in association with the Library of Congress and theVitra Design Museum,&nbsp2005.

Thisbook of Ray Eames and Charles is a combination of architectural workcontaining numerous expositions concentrated on various subjectsranging from building construction, design to architectural design.The book identifies with the life of the Eameses. It has around 200pages, with pages 127 – 149 concentrating on the details of theEames building. The writer of the exposition &quotReflections on theEames House,&quot has given full details on architectural work thatentails the specific drawing details of the house that makes the booka very vital resource for my research project. Albert and Donald intheir work contain a number of detailed drawings that up-to-dateidentified with current design. The content of their architecturalwork is easy to peruse and is brimming with detail. The authors havegiven a good setting to the Eames house, discussing the details floorby floor. This work by Donald and Albrechttherefore forms a valuable and important source of my research.

Pressman,Andrew.&nbspDesigningarchitecture: the elements of process.Routledge, 2012.

Pressmanand Andrew’s work named DesigningArchitectureis a book written with the aim of providing help, formulate an idea,and transforming these ideas into building while making effectivearchitectural decisions. The book promotes critical and integrativethinking which key components to an ideal architect. Moreover, itcontains numerous building projects that will provide new and vitalideas to the architectural project. The information entailed in thisbook is majorly architectural ideas leading to construction ofmagnificent structures. Although the book has little information onthe actual architectural work examples, there are extensiveexplanations and ideas of how to come up with the designs ofbuildings and other structures like bridges among others. Therefore,the Pressman and Andrew’s work provide a good source of informationfor the architectural project.

Upton,Dell. &quotWhite and black landscapes in eighteenth-centuryVirginia.&quot&nbspPlaces&nbsp2.2(1984).

Thearticle provides the early architectural designs. It elaborates onthe various design that were applied in the early nineties and arestill relevant to the modern architectural practices. The article hasalso provided some of the early base drawing of buildings. Thecontent of the article is relevant to the architectural study andtherefore makes the article a good and a vital source for theresearch. A number of designs of the buildings are discussed and thedetails of the architectural work are provided. The drawings of thebuildings given makes the source more relevant as it gives anoverview of the designs.The article promotes critical thinking a key component to an idealarchitect.

&nbsp&quotMotive9: On Drawing, Designing, Talking and Building.&quot&nbspArchitectureWorkbook,&nbsp2016,pp.&nbsp240-247.

Thisbook explores the inhabitation in relation to design thearchitecture, structure, detail of enclose, and circulation. The bookfocuses on the relationship of the building to both exterior andinterior design. It has a sequence of projects on architectural anddesign, which generally form the basis of the research. TheArchitectureWorkbookcontains a number of detailed drawings of current design. The contentof the book is easy to read and the book is brimming with detail. Theauthors have given a good setting to the project discussing thedetails floor by floor, which makes this source much relevant for theresearch.

SitePlan

FirstFloor Plan

GroundFloor Plan

WorksCited

Albrecht,Donald.&nbspTheWork of Charles and Ray Eames: A Legacy of Invention.Harry N. Abrams in association with the Library of Congress and theVitra Design Museum,&nbsp2005.

&quotMotive9: On Drawing, Designing, Talking and Building.&quot&nbspArchitectureWorkbook,&nbsp2016, pp.&nbsp240-247.

Pressman,Andrew.&nbspDesigningarchitecture: the elements of process.Routledge, 2012.

Upton,Dell. &quotWhite and black landscapes in eighteenth-centuryVirginia.&quot&nbspPlaces&nbsp2.2(1984).

Subject

  • Uncategorized

AnnotatedBibliography on Two Storied Building

Albrecht,Donald.&nbspTheWork of Charles and Ray Eames: A Legacy of Invention.Harry N. Abrams in association with the Library of Congress and theVitra Design Museum,&nbsp2005.

Thisbook of Ray Eames and Charles is a combination of architectural workcontaining numerous expositions concentrated on various subjectsranging from building construction, design to architectural design.The book identifies with the life of the Eameses. It has around 200pages, with pages 127 – 149 concentrating on the details of theEames building. The writer of the exposition &quotReflections on theEames House,&quot has given full details on architectural work thatentails the specific drawing details of the house that makes the booka very vital resource for my research project. Albert and Donald intheir work contain a number of detailed drawings that up-to-dateidentified with current design. The content of their architecturalwork is easy to peruse and is brimming with detail. The authors havegiven a good setting to the Eames house, discussing the details floorby floor. This work by Donald and Albrechttherefore forms a valuable and important source of my research.

Pressman,Andrew.&nbspDesigningarchitecture: the elements of process.Routledge, 2012.

Pressmanand Andrew’s work named DesigningArchitectureis a book written with the aim of providing help, formulate an idea,and transforming these ideas into building while making effectivearchitectural decisions. The book promotes critical and integrativethinking which key components to an ideal architect. Moreover, itcontains numerous building projects that will provide new and vitalideas to the architectural project. The information entailed in thisbook is majorly architectural ideas leading to construction ofmagnificent structures. Although the book has little information onthe actual architectural work examples, there are extensiveexplanations and ideas of how to come up with the designs ofbuildings and other structures like bridges among others. Therefore,the Pressman and Andrew’s work provide a good source of informationfor the architectural project.

Upton,Dell. &quotWhite and black landscapes in eighteenth-centuryVirginia.&quot&nbspPlaces&nbsp2.2(1984).

Thearticle provides the early architectural designs. It elaborates onthe various design that were applied in the early nineties and arestill relevant to the modern architectural practices. The article hasalso provided some of the early base drawing of buildings. Thecontent of the article is relevant to the architectural study andtherefore makes the article a good and a vital source for theresearch. A number of designs of the buildings are discussed and thedetails of the architectural work are provided. The drawings of thebuildings given makes the source more relevant as it gives anoverview of the designs.The article promotes critical thinking a key component to an idealarchitect.

&nbsp&quotMotive9: On Drawing, Designing, Talking and Building.&quot&nbspArchitectureWorkbook,&nbsp2016,pp.&nbsp240-247.

Thisbook explores the inhabitation in relation to design thearchitecture, structure, detail of enclose, and circulation. The bookfocuses on the relationship of the building to both exterior andinterior design. It has a sequence of projects on architectural anddesign, which generally form the basis of the research. TheArchitectureWorkbookcontains a number of detailed drawings of current design. The contentof the book is easy to read and the book is brimming with detail. Theauthors have given a good setting to the project discussing thedetails floor by floor, which makes this source much relevant for theresearch.

SitePlan

FirstFloor Plan

GroundFloor Plan

WorksCited

Albrecht,Donald.&nbspTheWork of Charles and Ray Eames: A Legacy of Invention.Harry N. Abrams in association with the Library of Congress and theVitra Design Museum,&nbsp2005.

&quotMotive9: On Drawing, Designing, Talking and Building.&quot&nbspArchitectureWorkbook,&nbsp2016, pp.&nbsp240-247.

Pressman,Andrew.&nbspDesigningarchitecture: the elements of process.Routledge, 2012.

Upton,Dell. &quotWhite and black landscapes in eighteenth-centuryVirginia.&quot&nbspPlaces&nbsp2.2(1984).

Subject

  • Uncategorized

DyslexiaDisorder

Dyslexiais a psychological condition that a person is born with and inhibitstheir learning capacity. The biological cause is a defect in thebrain that slows down an individual’s mental power to processgraphic symbols. Due to this defect, the condition alters the way theperson’s brain processes visual material especially written ones.The condition is characterized by difficulty in learning andprocessing new concepts. Individuals with dyslexia are not lazy orstupid. Most have average or better than expected insight, and theywork hard to defeat their learning issues. It is a type of learningincapacity. An individual with a learning disability experiencesdifficulty processing numbers or words. There are a few types oflearning inabilities and dyslexia is the term utilized when peopleexperience a challenge figuring out how to read, despite the factthat they are sufficiently shrewd and are motivated to learn.

Hence,the problem in dyslexia is a linguistic one, not a visual one.Dyslexia does not originate from a lack of knowledge. In fact,persons with serious dyslexia can be intelligent. Reason being, theeffects of this condition tend to vary from one person to the other.The only weakness among these individuals is the fact that they readat slower pace compared to people their age. Dyslexia often runs inthe family. Overall, dyslexia inhibits a specific brain function andcauses difficulties in word decoding, spelling and recognition.

Causesof Dyslexia

Currentresearch shows that dyslexia is a result of the manner in whichpersons brain to process data. Brain images taken by modern tools ofimaging indicates that when a person with this condition reads,different parts of their brain are under use which is different fromindividuals not suffering from the same condition. According to theimages, the rains of the people with dyslexia does not workefficiently during such task as reading. And this is the reason why aperson with dyslexia find reading to be such a daunting and slowtask. There is a generalization that dyslexia makes a person toreverse numbers and letters and view words in a backward manner(Tunick and Bruce p.81). What they do not know is that reversaloccurs as a regular part of their development and this is evident inmost children who are in first and second grade. Recognizing phonemesseems to be the main issue resulting from this condition, and itmakes it hard for the person to make the connection between lettersand sounds and also to blend the same sounds to form words.

Andthis becomes a problem for them to differentiate short words or saylonger phrases. A person with dyslexia takes a lot of time to saywords since most of the time they usually lose the meaning of thesentence and thus their reasoning becomes weak. The fact that thepeople with dyslexia usually have a tough time reading is notsurprising. They additionally have a tough time when it comes toexpressing themselves both orally and in writing. The condition is alanguage processing disorder, and as a result, it affects the variouslanguage forms be it written or spoken (Ehardt p.364). Forsome people, the condition is somewhat mild, so they do not have alot of struggle with written or spoken languages. Others usually findways on how to manage their status, but it requires a lot of extrawork and effort. The condition does not just disappear nor is itsomething which one can outgrow. But with the necessary assistance, aperson with this condition can learn how to read.

DyslexiaSigns and Symptoms

Dyslexiaaffects people in different ways so that indications may vary fromone youngster to the next. These symptoms appear as issues withprecision and familiarity with spelling and reading. In any case, ina few children, dyslexia can affect math, dialect, and write as well(Valdois et al. p.78). A key indication of dyslexia among children ishaving a tough time interpreting words. And this is the capacity tomatch letters to sounds and afterward, utilize that aptitude to readwords precisely and smoothly. One reason kids experience issuestranslating is that they frequently struggle with an essentialdialect aptitude called phonemic mindfulness. It is the capacity toperceive singular sounds in words.

Theproblem with this ability can appear as early as preschool. In a fewchildren, dyslexia is not visible until later, when they experiencedifficulty with more mind boggling aptitudes. These may incorporatesyntax, cognizance, familiarity, sentence structure and strongwriting. One potential indication of dyslexia is when childrenabstain from reading, both so anyone can hear and to themselves.Children may even get on the edge or baffled when reading. It canhappen even after they`ve mastered the reading art. The symptoms ofdyslexia can be different at various ages. Here are a few cases ofindications of dyslexia: in preschool the child has inconvenienceperceiving whether two words rhyme, struggles with taking without endthe starting sound from a word, struggles with adapting new words,has difficulty understanding letters and coordinating them to sounds(Team n.p).

Ingrade school the child has difficulty taking without end the centersound from a word or mixing a few sounds to make a word, often can`tperceive regular sight words, quickly overlooks how to spell asignificant number of the words she considers, gets stumbled up byword issues in math. In middle school, the child makes many spellingblunders, frequently needs to re-read sentences and entries, reads ata lower scholastic level than how she talks. At the secondary schoolthe person often skirts little words when perusing so anyone mighthear, doesn`t read at the normal review level, strongly inclinestoward various decision inquiries over fill-in-the-clear or shortanswer (Helping Children With Dyslexia n.p). Dyslexia doesn`t simplyinfluence learning. It can affect natural abilities and exercises,also. These incorporate social collaboration, memory and managingstress.

Diagnosis

Themost efficient way to know if a kid has dyslexia is to have themcompletely assessed, either privately or at school. Schoolassessments are free. A diagnosis can allow the youngster to get thenecessary help at school. That incorporates specific instructionswhen it comes to reading. Before taking a child for the assessment,in any case, it`s critical to discount any medicinal issues that maybe influencing everything. The doctor can check for vision or hearingproblems. There are a couple of experts who may assess kids fordyslexia. These incorporate school therapists, clinical analysts, andpediatric neuropsychologists. The evaluator will give a progressionof tests for dyslexia. They will likewise assess the kid in differentareas to see precisely where the shortcomings lie.

Atherapist will also search for various issues that may hinder thechild’s learning. These incorporate ADHD and psychological healthconcerns. ADHD frequently co-happens with dyslexia (Eggermont p.251).A few children with learning and consideration issues may likewisehave depression or anxiety. The family history and more informationabout the child`s weaknesses and strengths are essential duringdiagnosis. In some circumstances, the child`s teacher may also haveto give more details regarding the child`s performance in class. Theinformation will help the doctor to come up with an accuratediagnosis. Additionally, the doctor will prescribe approaches to helpthe kid. At school, this may lead to the child getting anIndividualized Education Program (IEP).

Treatmentfor dyslexia

Itis essential for relatives and the individual with dyslexia to recallthat dyslexia is not an illness. In the current society writing andreading is necessary parts of the regular day to day existence hencemedications that help individuals with dyslexia are essential forenhancing their adapting skills. There is as of now no cure fordyslexia. There are, in any case, a scope of pro and all aroundfocused medications that can help youngsters and grown-ups enhancetheir writing and reading aptitudes (Valdois et al. p.91). The soonera child undergoes assessment and gets the necessary help, the moreprobable he or she will accomplish long haul changes. Mental testinghelps the educator build up a more focused approach on how to teachthe child. A teacher who has the necessary training in helpingyoungsters with dyslexia will utilize a scope of systems to enhancethe kid`s perusing aptitudes. These systems, for the most part,include taking advantage of the child’s senses, including vision,touch, and hearing. A few kids find that following their fingeraround the state of letters helps them handle information even moreadequately.

Conclusion

Dyslexiais a learning disorder which has nothing to do with the person’slevel of intelligence. Persons with this condition has problemsprocessing information, especially the sounds made when pronouncingcertain letters which gives them a problem when it comes to writing,reading, speaking, spelling and math. Therefore, it is essential thatsuch persons get a constant reminder that despite the fact thatwriting and reading might be an issue to them, a significant numberof persons with dyslexia worldwide have flourished and turned out tobe productive and successful people.

WorksCited

Eggerrmont,Jos. &quotDyslexia, specific language impairment, and auditoryprocessing disorder.&quot

AuditoryTemporal Processing and its Disorders(2015): 244-68. Web.

Ehardt,K. &quotDyslexia, not disorder.&quot Dyslexia15.4 (2009): 363-66. Web.

&quotHelpingChildren with Dyslexia.&quot WebMD.WebMD, n.d. Web. 29 Mar. 2017.

Team,The Understood. &quotDyslexia: What You`re Seeing.&quotUnderstood.org.N.p., n.d. Web. 29

Mar.2017.

Tunick,Rachel A., and Bruce F. Pennington. &quotThe etiologicalrelationship between reading

disabilityand phonological disorder.&quot Annalsof Dyslexia52.1 (2002): 75-97. Web.

Valdois,Sylviane, Delphine Lassus-Sangosse, and Muriel Lobier. &quotImpairedLetter-String

Processingin Developmental Dyslexia: What Visual-to-Phonology Code MappingDisorder?&quot Dyslexia18.2 (2012): 77-93. Web.

Subject

  • Uncategorized

Student’s Last Name 5

DD Month YYYY

Creation Comparison andContrast

Stories of creation carry themost vital aspects of the cultures that drafted them. They not onlyshow the people’s values but also depict the way these cultureshave been leading their lives and how they regard their deities. Someof them are under consideration,and they include the Africans, the North American, the Greek and theHebrew cultures. As such, it is imperative to ponder on the specificmyths of these cultures(Pijoan 17). TheHopi people hailing from Northern Arizona have amyth called TheFour Creations.During the 1950s, Oswald White and his wife recorded the accountsfrom the old people of this culture. The Gaiamyth is from theGreek culture whose account is believed to have beenwritten by apoet known as Hesiod,and it explains the role of Greek gods and the story of creation.Furthermore, the Yoruba people ofBenin, Nigeria,and Togo have a myth known as TheGolden Chainexplaining the origin of life and people. Finally, the Yahwehmyth of the Hebrewis to beconsidered aswell. These four mythsare to bedissectedthrough the lens of the major theme rupture. Therefore, it is uponthe loneliness,void nature and emptiness of the universe that the deities decided toinitiate life onthe basis ofhelping because everything that wascreated neededanother one for survival(Pijoan 25).

The Yahwehmyth of the Hebrewwasrecorded in theold testament of the Bible. The primordial cosmos was formless,and there existed Yahweh, His angels,and son, Jesus Christ. However, this state prompted him to createheaven and earth. But because the land was barren and dry, there camea mist that wetted the land.As a result, Yahweh shaped the dust into a manand gave him life. An uncanny consideration of this story mainlyredirects the reader to the fact that there was no possibility ofEarthbeing under control without a helper to take care of it. This helperwould be a man.However, the sole reason for the creation of the man was for controland management of his movements. Furthermore, Yahweh decided toreward the manwith a helper by creating the beasts. The beasts were not enough tohelp the man.Thus Yahweh lethim to a deep slumberand removed a rib from him andused it to make a woman known as Eve. In a nutshell, the decision ofYahweh to establish a garden for Adam, create a helper for him in thename of Eve and provide earthlycreatures, plants,and many others is for the sole reason of helping. Therefore, it isclear that the rupture in this myth wasanchored on thesame premise of “helping”(Pijoan 33).

In the Greek mythology aboutGaia, the rupture isrealized whenChaos suddenly gets filled with Gaia, a name for earth. Just like theYahweh myth, Gaia myth isheld on the“helping” concept(Murtagh n. p).Thisisseen where Gaiagives birth to Uranus, who was starry and helped in the provision ofdomiciles for the immortals. Based on the same “helping” concept,Gaia bears the mountains to help the birds and other creations have aplace to live. Thus, the unseenpowers create helpers for each substance that ismade(Murtagh n. p).Additionally, Gaia undergoes changes that ensure other creaturesthrive in it. Just as mentioned earlier about humans, trees erupt outof Gaia to paint it green and help in the normallyknown processes of photosynthesis and water recycling. On the otherhand, Uranus can beequated to theheavens in the Yahwehmyth of theHebrews. Here, the deities, angels and other immortal beings thrive.As such, the helping concept isrealized on anextensive ground in the myth.

The Yoruba myth about thegolden chain has a primordial state that majors on life in the sky.The Olorun was the supreme being,and he thrived with orishas(Jaja 4). Oneorisha known as Obatala was used to bring about the rupture where hehanged the golden chain from the sky to the waters. Thechain was made by a goldsmith.He had carried some sand that helped create land in the waters below(Jaja 6). TheObatala madebodies resembling his reflection in a pond,and theywere given life by Olorunas a form of helping Obatala. In this regard, it is only Olorun’sdesire to help Obatala that life began after the rupture(Murtagh n. p).

The Hopi people’s mythshows a primordial state of an endless space with no form. There wasa creator known as Taiowa(Pijoan 45). Therupture begins when Taiowa needs some help. As such, he createdSotuknang, calling him a nephew and would helpin the establishment of the nine universes. The Sotuknang wasthen given morepowers of creating life in the form of human beings, animals, the seacreatures among others. All these creatures wereaimed at helpingeach other. Therefore, the entire creation process since theinception of the rupture in this myth was a series of reliance on theprevious creature(Pijoan 83).

In conclusion, the creationmyths from diverse cultures have some slight differences,but the commonalities are conspicuous. For instance, the Greek, theNorthern American, and the African cultures have various myths thatencompass the theme of rupture. The ruptureisbased on thedeity’s decision of helping one creature after the other. Thisphenomenon forms the basis of this discussion. The Hopi people ofNorth Arizona, the Yoruba of Nigeria, Benin and Togo, the Hebrews,and the Greek have myths that have beenuncannily considered.The Hopi people’s creation myth begins by insisting on the need forTaiowa, the supernatural being to have a helper. As such, he createsSotuknang. The Hebrew myth reflects on Yahweh who creates and breathslife in a man called Adam. Moreover, he creates a helper for the man,and her name is Eve. The Yoruba talk about Olorun who helps Obatalaby giving life to the bodies that he made earlier. The Greekmythology reflects on Chaos and Gaia. Gaia develops mountains andtrees in a bid to help the ecosystem thrive. Therefore, the fourmyths arefounded on thepremise of “helping”a reason that the rupture ensures, then followed by a series ofcreations.

WorksCited

Jaja, JonesM. &quotMyths in African conceot of reality.&quot InternationalJournal of the Educational Administration and the Policy Studies(2012): 1-6.

Murtagh,Lindsey. Common Elements in CreationMyths. March 2013.http://www.cs.williams.edu/lindsey/myths/myths.html

Pijoan,Teresa. American Indian Creation Myths.New Mexico: Sunstone Press, 2012.

Subject

  • Uncategorized

Promptand Utter Destructionby J. Samuel Walker: Revisiting the Hiroshima and Nagasaki AtomicBombings

QuestionOne

Towardsthe end of the war in Europe, America refocused its attention on itswar with Japan. However, while America was militarily superior to itsenemy, it became increasingly clear that a decisive victory was noton the horizon. This was because the war battle was far away fromAmerican shores, making it difficult and costly to mount air raidsand ground invasions. Coupled with the Japanese fanaticism andreputation of fighting to the last man, it became necessary to find asolution, which could not only bring the war into a speed end butalso minimize casualties. At the same time, concerns overAmerican-Soviet relationships after the war necessitated the need todemonstrate America`s military might. Accordingly, Truman chose touse the atomic bomb to achieve three important objectives asdiscussed below.

Thefirst objective was to bring the war with Japan to a speedy end. AsSamuel Walker writes in his book, Promptand Utter Destruction: Truman and the Use of Atomic Bombs againstJapan,ending the war with Japan as quickly as possible was a top priorityfor America. However, according to General George Marshall,“attacking Japan with any other conventional weapons did notguarantee an end to the war” (Walker 3). In the bombing of Tokyowith incendiaries, for instance, the aim was to shorten the war bydestroying the Japanese factories that gave them the motive to fightas well as weaken their fighting morale (Walker 27). Given theconstant resistance from the Japanese even after the air raids, theatomic bomb was chosen as a sure way to weaken and force the Japaneseto quickly surrender.

Secondly,Truman hoped to minimize American casualties by using a war strategythat did not involve a ground invasion. The desire to minimizecasualties on the American side had long been a U.S. war strategyfrom the days of Franklin Roosevelt, Truman`s predecessor. During aradio broadcast on November 1, 1944, Roosevelt has stated that &quotInwinning this war,&quot the surest way to minimize casualties is byensuring that &quotwe have overwhelming material superiority&quotin every military operation (Walker 9-10). The atomic bomb promisedthe material superiority regarding military arsenals that will allowthe Americans not only to involve few combatants but also to wage warwithout following the costly ground invasion.

Perhapsmost important to Truman and his advisors were post-war politicalcalculations, whereby they wanted to have the upper hand in theirdiplomatic dealings with the Soviet over Eastern Europe issues.Accordingly, it was necessary to intimidate the Soviets with a showof military superiority, and consequently, give America leverage inachieving its diplomatic objectives (Walker 17). This objective isbest captured by Secretary of War Henry Stimson’s observation thatthe bomb as a simple probable weapon was arguably a weak reed onwhich to rely, but the response that the bomb was a colossal realityis very different (Walker 2). Thus, Truman and his advisors favoredthe use of the atomic bomb not only to end the war as soon aspossible while minimizing American casualties but most importantlyuse the American power to impress the Soviets and manage themeffectively in Eastern Europe (Walker 17).

QuestionTwo

Despitethe pressing need to minimize American casualties, bring the war to aspeedy end and intimidate the Soviets, America should not have stillused the atomic bomb because it was not the only option available atthe time to achieve these objectives. First, even long before thedestruction of Nagasaki and Horoshima, the Japanese were on the vergeof surrendering. The report prepared by Japan`s chief cabinetsecretary Hisatsune Sakomizu indicated that Japan lacked theresources to carry on the war the air raids by American bombers haddestroyed transport and communication infrastructure and, as well as,affected food production and supply (Walker 28). This showed that allthat the Americans needed was time before the Japanese will come tothe negotiation table for a peace treaty. All that the Japanese hopedfor in their continued fighting was &quotbetter surrender terms&quot(Walker 29). This reflection is supported by reports that the US hadintercepted communications between Tokyo and Moscow in which theformer was looking for a desirable way to surrender (Walker 46).Regardless, the U.S still went ahead with its atomic bomb plansbecause its primary objective was winning a complete victory thatleft the Japanese no bargaining power on the peace negotiation table.

Thirdly,the use of the atomic bomb was uncalled for because strategicallypositioned American submarines had cut off Japanese homeland islandsfrom essential military supplies. This situation meant that Japanesearmy had been weakened to a point where an atomic bomb was notnecessary to determine the outcome of the war. It is very likely,therefore, that sooner than later, the Japanese could havesurrendered on their own, and most likely, on America`s terms. It isunlikely that the Americans were not aware of Japan`s weakeningsituation given that the latter were becoming increasingly desperateon the battlefield to the extent of using warplanes for suicideattacks, suggesting that they did not have the capacity to carry outraids (Walker 29). In any case, America’s B-29 bombers were doingthe job of terrorizing the Japanese into submission just fine byusing incendiaries to raze Japanese cities. Were the 87,000 or morecivilian casualties on March 9-10 1945 not satisfying enough on thepart of the Americans that they had inflicted enough damage to forcethe Japanese into surrender? In light of the casualties anddestruction caused by the b-29 bombers, the atomic bomb was notnecessary to win the war.

QuestionThree

Personally,I think that both bombs were not necessary to achieve the objectivesof the war with Japan. Going by the objectives of Truman and hisadvisers to achieve a quick victory over the Japanese and minimizeAmerican casualties, I think that the initial bombing of Hiroshimawas enough to bring even the most ardent Japanese military officialsinto the reality of their hopeless situation. This is because theresistance shown by the Japanese was not informed by the hope ofdefeating the Americans, but forcing favorable surrender terms.Indeed, it is informing that as early as June 1945, long before theatomic bombing, Japan’s top army generals were looking for ways ofending the war promptly and on satisfactory terms (Walker 30). Thisshows that the use of both bombs was not that central to the war`seventual outcome as far as Japan`s surrender was concerned.

Secondly,America could have played that Soviet card as planned from thebeginning. The Soviet’s entry into the war against Japan, whichthey were more than willing to do, was guaranteed to force theJapanese into surrender seeing that they were up against enemies withsuperior military capabilities. The combined forces of the Sovietsand Americans could have certainly intimidated the Japanese intototal surrender. Truman`s position was complicated by the fact thathe was keen to intimidate the Soviets as well because, after the warwith Japan, the Soviets would be America`s new concern politically(Walker 31).

Nevertheless,reading the book changed my mind particularly with regards to theSoviet question in post-war international relationships. The Trumanadministration was concerned that the Soviets were looking to expandtheir influence and dominance in Eastern Europe, Asia and China(Walker 40). This development could have created conditions forfuture conflicts and wars. As such, it was necessary for America toshow the Soviets- who until then had been unchallenged in theirexpansionist policies- that there was a new center of power in thewestern hemisphere who can stand up to Moscow’s foreign aggressionpolicies. Using both bombs, therefore, sent the message home bydemonstrating that America had not only one but several atomic bombsto cause untold destruction on her enemies. After the Hiroshima andNagasaki, Moscow could not have wished to make America its enemy.Perhaps it was because of this that world witnessed littlelarge-scale armed conflicts because any country that desired to starta war worried about America’s atomic bombs.

QuestionFour

Unconditionalsurrender is the demand for the loser in an armed conflict to give into the terms of the victor as a condition for a ceasefire. One of thedebates surrounding this issue is the fairness of unconditionalsurrender and the desire to ensure that the loser will not usepeacetime as a window to reorganize and retaliate against the victor.Office of War Information (OWI) increased this fear when it informedthe American public that anything short of an unconditional surrenderwould encourage Japan to disrupt peace, which will weaken herindustrial and territorial strength (Walker 44). These fears could belegitimate if the lessons from World War I and Germany’sreorganization to start World War II are anything to go by.

Itis here that the dropping of the Atomic bomb turned the course of thewar by forcing the Japanese to accept America’s terms forsurrender. While the Japanese were initially adamant of securingstrategic concessions from America before they can surrender, theatomic bombs demonstrated that the Americans were keen to wipe outJapan’s cities as long as the Japanese continued to stall theirsurrender expecting to gain any concessions.

QuestionFive

Nevertheless,if I was in Truman`s shoes, I could still have used the atomic bombnot primarily to win the war against Japan, but to put the Soviet`sexpansionist agenda in check. Being a newly sworn-in president whohad inherited a raging war in Europe and the Far East, assertingAmerica`s military superiority both to assure the American public andintimidate America`s future enemies could have persuaded me to usethe atomic bomb. However, I could have used it differently becausethe objective is not to cause human loss but to demonstrate itsdestructive abilities. Accordingly, I could have targeted lesspopulated sites such as isolated military posts.

Conclusion

Inconclusion, Walker’s presentations in Promptand Utter Destruction: Truman and the Use of Atomic Bombs againstJapanprovide new and critical insights into understanding thecircumstances surrounding the atomic bombing of Hiroshima andNagasaki. One way that the book changed my understanding of thesubject is by portraying the Soviet as a major rather than asecondary factor in the use of the atomic bomb. Walker makes it clearthat America could have won the war with Japan without Sovietassistance or using the atomic bomb. Accordingly, the real objectivewas not a military one as far as the war was concerned, but apolitical calculation in post-war diplomatic realignments in Europe,Asia, and China. The U.S. saw the Soviet as a significant threat inpost-war foreign relations and wanted to pass the message that itwill not allow Moscow to bully its way around. The reading alsoinforms my approach to researching and writing about global issues.The most important lesson is the need to consider the self-interestsof involved key players in determining the course of world events. Asthe circumstances surrounding the U.S.’s use of the atomic bombsuggest, consideration of competing self-interests associated with anevent can help historians and researchers to have an accurate pictureof the real causes of world events.

WorksCited

Walker,Samuel. Promptand Utter Destruction: Truman and the Use of Atomic Bombs against

JapanThird Edition. ChapelHill, North Carolina: The University of North Carolina Press, 2009.Print.

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Student’s Last Name 2

DD Month YYYY

AMERICAN HISTORY IN THE 1700s

The historical perspective ofAmerica carries intriguing,funny and memorable happenings that attract national andinternational recognition. However, it depicts the seriousness andstrength that the most powerful nation on earth has endured toachieve its lucrative status quo. In this regard, there is need toponder on some specific paragraphs from the lessons carrying vitaldetails on the history of America. Moreover, an analysis of thesociety and how it dealt with issues of ethics and decision making isto beextrapolated.Furthermore, the analysis based on social, political, economic, andglobal forces among other dimensions will beconsidered. Thethree paragraphs are the LouisianaPurchase, Indiansand the Puritanpower hits a snag.Therefore, the analysis and consideration of such accounts arevital froma wider perspective.

The Puritanpower hits a snag givesdetails of the 1690s and the witchcraft craze from Europe to itscolonies. This item was of interest in the sense that an entiresociety endured a hoax that wasalmost believeduntil it was proven to be only a fungus that was causing neurologicalsymptoms such as hallucination to the people. From a historical pointof view, the 1690s entailed less knowledge about diseases and markedthe early years of the onset of a renaissance.As such, many people were not aware of sophisticated pathogens andthe diseases that they caused. Additionally, the global forces ofcolonialism influenced the culture and behavior of peoplein the colonies. Thisis the reason Salem gets affected by the witchcraft. The society wasnot steadfast in handling ethics. In this period, people tookadvantage of the witchcraft phobia to oppress others. Therefore,ethical decisions weremade by theelite and street announcements implicating individuals.

In lesson two, the paragraphabout Indiansis interesting because trouble and problems caused rival Indiantribes to seek acommon courseforjustice. Initially, one tribe would celebrate the murder of anotherby the British and vice versa. On a political point of view, therewas lackof harmony and commonleadership among the original inhabitants of North America. As such,their naivety wasdemonstratedthrough celebrationof the murder of other tribes. Intriguingly, there was expressionof the same naivety on the British and French sides. This movefostered the Indians unity under King Pontiac. Consequently, this ledto their unity.Again, the ethical decisions were not amicably reached upon becausethe imperialists controlled everything. An example is where a Britonwatches Indians kill themselves.

The LouisianaPurchase was aboutthe territorial protection because the Spanish were unnerved byPike’s exploration of Mexico. It is an interesting piece because itexpressed the rivalry that the European imperialists had against oneanother. Thisisanalyzed in theeyes of global forces. Here, the territorial dominance in thecolonial era was paramountand boundaries were protected. They prevented invasion by othergroups. Ethics were never upheld because freedom was not allowed. Forinstance, Pike is escorted back to the border by the Spanish.

In conclusion, the Americanhistory has interesting facts. For example, the paragraphs about theIndians,the LouisianaPurchaseand the Europeanwitchcraft crazecarry some humorous as well painful accounts. Additionally, all ofthem do not have an established and mature ethical decision makingframework, but instead leave the major decisions to the elite and theimperial. An analysis of these themes has been importantfor enhancement.

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Student’s Last Name 3

DD Month YYYY

Story in the Voice of anAnimal

During one evening, a cat,named Ricky, embarked on his daily routine of strolling in the woods.Normally, he does this with swiftness and ease because the season isripe for variousfoods. Thereis too much rain, it is green everywhere, and the mice are fatter.Therefore, he needs only one of them for the evening. However, he hasbeen battling with a seriousconcern for too long. Out of his normalcuriosity, he changed the evening’s idea along the way from gettingfood to visiting Gerry,the fox. Lately, Gerry has gained fame in the woods for being wellexperienced and intelligent, an issue that troubles Ricky. As aresult, he wanted to establish the extent of Gerry’s wit.Therefore, he had to assume ahumble andinnocent stunt that would woo Gerry into unleashing his wittyprowess. This conversation reveals the events.

Cat: Goodevening my dearfriend, I have heard that you are thriving well in these spectacularmoments of the woods.

(The fox, full of haughtinessand hate, inspected the cat from his head to the toes and wonderedwhether to respond or just walk away. Lastly, he expresses a face ofpride and responds.)

Fox: Oh poor cat, who onlyknows the taste of mice and his tasteless beards, the most fool amongthe fools, and the inexperiencedanimal seeking asylum from humans, what do you have to tell me? Wheredid you get the guts toseek audience fromthe wisest of the woods? Tell me the tricks that you know.

(The cat mockingly leaks hisbeards, wipes his face with the feet and elevates the paws for thefoxto see the claws.

The foxgiggles in return, disqualifying the cat’s stunt. Despite that, thecat responds to the fox’s question.)

Cat: I only have one trick,my friend.

Fox: Which is?

Cat: When I get in troublewith anyone, like the dogs, I only have the claws that help me climbtrees for safety. (The foxlaughs to the top of his voice. His response aimed at mocking thecat.)

Fox: I have a thousand andone ways of evading my nemesis. Come hereI will enlightenyou about them. I know you have a thick skull that can only sustain afew lessons,but I will try to help you. (Just before the foxfinishes his words, dogs are heard barking from a distance, the twohide behind a rock.)

Cat: Let us reveal ourselvesand run for safety, these dogs won’t catch you because you have amillion tricks. I know they will pursue me because I am weak. (Thefox gets frightened but still maintains his courage. The cat swingshis tail and scratches the claws on the ground, ready to move. Whenthe dogs and the hunter approach, the cat meows. The dogs arealerted, and they begin running after the two. Nimbly, the cat jumpsup the tree using his claws. The leaves and branches of the treecompletely hide him. The two dogs pursue the fox despite his fastpace. Lastly, they catch him and even break one of his legs. Thehunterwraps the fox in a sack.)

Cat: Untie yourself fox, yourskin is precious, they will kill you for it. You have a milliontricks,dear friend, use one to save yourself. (The cat then elevates hisclaws, wipes his face and bids bye to the fox)

Cat: Say hi to the devil inhell my friend. (Heclimbs down, and heads to theplace where he gets his food, the mice)

The cat only wanted to proveto the fox that focus and practice is an important aspect of one’slife. The foxonly wanted the fame and pride from the other animals in the woods.However, the cat focused on a single but fruitful trick. As such, themove was helpful to drive him out of danger. In this regard, it isimperative to elevate the talent that one possesses.

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Academic Progress Report

My name is Sally Davis, and I am in my second year at MassachusettsInstitute of Technology taking a diploma course in BusinessManagement. I was admitted to college in spring in 2016. As astudent, I have aspiration and goals, but my major target is tofinish college with a pass before I join a local bank. The progressin school has so far been great, and I have supporting family,friends, and tutors. It has not been all smooth especially in thefield of academics due to pressure from classwork and projects. Thecollege gives its students a lot of opportunities in both academic,sport among other activities.

Goals

My academic goal is to get through college smoothly, with goodgrades, and also with adequate knowledge and experience in my fieldof study. Achieving good grades so far has not been an easy task forme, but I am scoring above average in most of my subjects. I seekassistance from my tutors on various subjects, and also my friends.The academic progress is fair since I have never repeated or make-upany exam. My average score for last semester was 69%, and my tutorswere happy because I had made a tremendous improvement in all mysubjects.

My social life has also been good because I am an active participantin the business, debate and first aid clubs. I have participated invarious social events that are organized by these clubs and I havebeen appointed a secretary of the business club and a member of theorganizing committee of the debate club. We have so far participatedin various community activities like visiting nursing homes,environmental activities like tree planting, among others. Throughthe clubs, my social and communication skills have improvedtremendously. I have also built my confidence and eloquence of speechthrough the debate clubs.

Regarding financial goals, I have not made much progress so far dueto tight schedules that I have. However, I had applied for a job at alocal supermarket, to make extra cash for my personal projects.

I have also improved my professional skills in many ways. First,through the first summer internship, I took at a local bank andthrough seminars that I have attended both in school and in thecommunity. I am also a part of the online social network that bringstogether young professionals in the business.

Personally, I have improved my soft and hard skills in various areas,through the social activities that I participate and also through theprofessional networks that I have created. I have also improved mysocial, networking, communication and professional skills throughvarious interactions in school and the community.

I am not an active member of any sport. I play bowling as a hobbywhen I am free. I also participate in swimming as a leisure activity.

GoalsAchievement to Date

To date, I can confidently say that I have made progress regardingmeeting my targets, both academically, socially, professionally andpersonally. I intend to continue focusing more strength towardsacademic, professional and personal development because I feel that Ihave a lot to learn. My academic score is at 69.8%, and my verbalcommunication skill is not well refined.

Challengesfaced and solutions

One of my greatest challenge in college so far is balancing myacademic and social responsibilities. The coursework is demanding,and also, I have to participate in projects and lab sessions. At thesame time, I have to find adequate time to attend meetings of theclubs. I will have to tighten my schedule further if I get jobplacement at the supermarket. All these activities may have an impacton my academic progress. However, I intend to resign from theorganizing committee of the debate club, so that I can create moretime for study. I also plan to rearrange my schedule to ensure that Ialso create time for my friends and family.

Work cited

Shum, Simon Buckingham, et al. &quotTowards Reflective WritingAnalytics: Rationale, Methodology and Preliminary Results.&quotJournal of Learning Analytics 4.1 (2017): 58-84.

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Last 2

RonaldReagan

RonaldReagan’s greatest legacy was his ability to connect with the peopleof all social divides. Reagan was the 40thAmerican president (Whitehouse.gov).His term extended from 20thJan. 1981 to 19thJan. 1989. He defeated Jimmy Carter by 50.7% of the total votes andwon his second term by 58.8% (Nelson1526).The proponents of Reagan’s policies contend that he played acritical part in stimulating the economic growth of the U.S.,strengthening the national defense of the country, bringing an end tothe cold war, and invigorating the Republican Party (Whitehouse.gov).However, his opponents claim that he bloated that national defense,significantly reduced the social service budgetary allocation, andcaused significant deficits in the American budget. The followingdiscussion reveals the economic status of the U.S. during Reagan’stenure, the various issues that faced Ronald’s administration, andwhether or not he was a good president.

Reaganinstituted what came to be described as “Reaganomics” afterascending to power. Before Ronald’s tenure, the inflation rate ofthe economy was at 9%, and the interest rate was at 20% (Ahmed62).Ronald’s “Reaganomics” was instituted to combat these outcomes(Gee204).Reagan instituted economic policies that favored defense spending,lowered personal income taxes, decreased business regulation, andbrought down social service expenditure (Landyand Milkis 171).In essence, Reagan`s administration placed emphasis on supply-sideeconomics this move was aimed at decreasing taxes to boost economicgrowth. Legislation like the 1981 Economic Recovery Tax Act, the 1982TaxEquity and Fiscal Responsibility Act, and the 1986 Tax Reform Actwere among the most popular initiatives of Reagan’s administration(Gwartney).These legislations led to some of the largest tax cuts in the postwarperiod.

Asa result of the above policies, the economy of the U.S. experiencedthe worst recession since the Depression. The Federal Reserve wasmade to raise interest rates to combat the 14% increase in inflationrates(Landy and Milkis 171).By November 1982, the rate of unemployment had gone up by 10.8%.Consequently, thousands of businesses were closed many elderly,sick, and poor people became homeless and farmers lost their lands.By January 1983, about 11.5 million people were unemployed. In theend, Reagan’s disapproval ratings rose to above 50% (Landyand Milkis 171).

Consideringthe above assertions, Reagan’s character made him both a goodpresident and a bad one. Reagan’ charm, for example, helped him toconnect with both the ordinary citizens and other world leaders(Nelson1526).This quality led to the development of the nickname “The GreatCommunicator.” Ronald’s speeches enabled him to regain the trustof his electorate. Thus, even after he left office, many peoplerevered him for his exceptional leadership style. Nonetheless,Reagan’s hands-off leadership approach led to the growth ofunlawful activities like the “Iran-Contra” scandal. Reaganallowed his Chief of Staff to make most decisions on his behalfthus, some of the decisions that were made did not favor the Americangovernment.

Additionally,Reagan’s ideology of crime led to the development of mixedreactions about his leadership approach. The president’s “War onDrugs” campaign, for example, resulted in a significant decline incasual drugs abuse. The budget for the drug war was increased from$1.5 billion (in 1981) to 2.75 billion (in 1986)(Nelson1526).Reagan also penned eight executive orders that were directed to crimeand justice. Additionally, he signed five bills, over the 1984 to1988 period, to combat crime. However, his speeches revealed asomewhat different world outlook. Reagan contended that theperpetrators of crime do not engage in illegal activities becausethey are desperate to earn a livelihood, but because they werebrought up in a way that predisposes them to act criminally(Niskanen).This utterance failed to take into consideration the fundamentalrealities that existed on the ground, for example, the nationalculture of discrimination and poverty.

Also,Reagan’s foreign policy initiatives had both negative and positiveimplications. Reagan ended the 46-year old cold war through acombination of anti-communist and hostile rhetoric he also embarkedon a massive arms increase that was followed by disarmament andskillful diplomatic negotiations (Niskanen).As a result, the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, two years after hisBrandenburg Gate Speech. Nonetheless, some of Reagan’s foreignpolicies went against his promises. For instance, Reagan’sadministration aided the guerilla fighters in Nicaragua (theIran-Contra scandal)(Niskanen).Reagan`s support was manifested in the form of financial donations tothe militants.

Ina recap of the above discussion, the legacy of Regan was hisadministration, which led to both the improvement and deteriorationof the economy of America. Ronald`s policies stimulated the economyof the United States, brought an end to the cold war, and improvedthe defense of America. However, the same policies had adverseeffects on the American economy since they bloated the budgetaryallocation for defense, led to significant budget cuts in the socialservice sector, and resulted in the development of the worstrecession since the Depression. In general, history reveals thatReagan’s ability to regain the confidence of both the world leadersand his electorate helped him to come up with some of the mostrational policies, as discussed above.

WorksCited

Ahmed,Alouani. &quotInflation And Growth In The USA, From Eisenhower To G.W. Bush: A Descriptive Study&quot.&nbspInternationalJournal of Economics, Finance and Management&nbsp4.2(2015): 62.http://www.ejournalofbusiness.org/archive/vol4no2/vol4no2_3.pdf.

Gee,JW. ReflectionsOf A Partly Cloudy Mind.1st ed. [Place of publication not identified]: Xlibris Corporation,2013. Print.

Gwartney,James D. &quotSupply-Side Economics: The Concise Encyclopedia OfEconomics | Library Of Economics And Liberty.&quot Econlib.org.N.p., 2017.http://www.econlib.org/library/Enc/SupplySideEconomics.html

Landy,Marc Karnis, and Sidney M. Milkis. AmericanGovernment.1st ed. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014.https://books.google.com/books?id=dj0-CgAAQBAJ&ampprintsec=frontcover&ampdq=American+Government.&amphl=en&ampsa=X&ampredir_esc=y#v=onepage&ampq=American%20Government.&ampf=false.

Nelson,Michael.&nbspGuideto The Presidency.1st ed. Hoboken, United States: Taylor and Francis, 2015.https://books.google.com/books?id=fK_lCAAAQBAJ&amppg=PA1526&ampdq=He+defeated+Jimmy+Carter,+the+Democratic+Party+incumbent,&amphl=en&ampsa=X&ampredir_esc=y#v=onepage&ampq=He%20defeated%20Jimmy%20Carter%2C%20the%20Democratic%20Party%20incumbent%2C&ampf=false.

Ness,Immanuel.&nbspEncyclopediaof Interest Groups And Lobbyists In The United States.1st ed. Taylor and Francis, 2015.https://books.google.com/books?id=VvwvCgAAQBAJ&amppg=PR4&ampdq=Encyclopedia+of+Interest+Groups+And+Lobbyists+In+The+United+States&amphl=en&ampsa=X&ampredir_esc=y#v=onepage&ampq=Encyclopedia%20of%20Interest%20Groups%20And%20Lobbyists%20In%20The%20United%20States&ampf=false.

Niskanen,William A. &quotReaganomics, By William A. Niskanen: The ConciseEncyclopedia Of Economics | Library Of Economics AndLiberty&quot.&nbspEconlib.org.N.p., 2017. http://www.econlib.org/library/Enc1/Reaganomics.html

Whitehouse.gov.&quotRonald Reagan.&quot whitehouse.gov.N.p., 2017. https://www.whitehouse.gov/1600/presidents/ronaldreagan.

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Student’s Last Name 6

DD Month YYYY

Bigfoot Exists in Real Life

If anybody walking on thestreet isasked aboutBigfoot, he/she never lacks an opinion. Did Bigfoot ever exist?This question has positedmuch skepticism and laughter fifty years ago in the history of theworld (Laursen 17).The question is, who is Bigfoot? Inthe folklore of America, it is a creature said to be inhabiting thewilderness regions of Canada and the United States, particularly theGreat Lakes, the Southwest of Canada, Northwest Pacific, RockyMountains, the U.S Northeast forests, and the Southern States of theU.S. Mostly, it is described as a bipedal, hairy and large humanoid.There have been accounts by eyewitnesses about wild men with hairybodies, inhabiting the darkest and deepest areas of this worldespecially forests. Moreover, there have been many handsand footprint castings and movies produced about Bigfoot. Otherareas arebelieved to be describing this creature with their regionalnames like Yeti or may be names related closely to the species(Laursen 17).Such scenarios have beenwitnessed inChina, Malaysia, Russia, Hawaii, South America, and Australia. Thefeeling that a giant monkeyis moving aroundthe continent of North America sounds illogical and preposterous(&quotBigfoot. TheYeti And Sasquatch In Myth And Reality&quot 583).As a matter of fact, this feeling may not be crazy at all. Inthis regard, the evidence that exists is sufficient to convince anuncanny scholar that indeed, Bigfoot is a real creature.

Eyewitnesses have opened upabout directly or indirectly encountering Bigfoot,and their accounts are real.Peter Caine, an artist,and trainer of dogs,uploaded a video of a frozen limb he believes belongs to Bigfoot(Laursen 17).When he was young, his father hunted the creature and shot it in1953. As such, he froze the foot in a tub for preservation. In hisexplanation, Caine says that his father was with a friend and theBigfoot was pursuing them threatening their life. As an act ofdefense, he shot the creature. The animal’sfeet were like a shoe for the snow, enhancing the swiftness of itspace. Robert Grimlinand Roger Patterson took a motion picture of Sasquatchand no doubt that it was truthful. Roger’s last words were that“Bigfoot is real”(Ravalli 345).The authenticity of this footage cannot bequestionedbecause in 1967when it wastaken inCalifornia, there was no advanced technology to manipulate videos. Infact, there was a noise of something walking and footprints of ahumanoid. In this regard, it is only clear that these guys should bebelieved to have seen the creature (Ravalli345).

InMartinsville, an anonymous hunter claims to have been attacked by thecreature.He described a two to a three-meter-tallbipedal creature with shoulders that are extensiveand broad. He also explains that it had a brow that is pronounced,pointed forehead, rounded and crested body. As such, various peoplecannotcreate stories from anywherejust to gainpublicrecognition. There is need to believe in this evidence becausenothing is far from the truth. Dave Wargo is another witness whoencountered Sasquatchin 1973, in Northern Ohio. He spotted it a hundred yards away andembarked on a mission to unearth evidence to the people (Ravalli346). He found poopthat was big enough to march no bear, deer, or human. Definitely,it wasBigfoot’s.

Thephysical evidence of the existence of Sasquatch has beenpresented atvarious levels by a series of researchers, ordinary people, andby-chance-encounters(Laursen 17).

In 2012, Michel Sartoniand a colleague called Sykes shed some light on more concreteevidence. The duo compared the DNA from the hairs with the accountsfrom previous studies and found out that indeed, the hairs belong toBigfoot. Some widely known expeditions such as Sir Edmund Hillary’strek, museums, and other enthusiasts of the monster gave what theybelieved were hairs of the creature and were used to compare it withSykes’ findings. Thereport they gave says “Approximately113 separate samples of blood, hair, toenails, mucus, saliva, skin,and bark scrapings and subcutaneous tissue attached were submitted bydozens of individuals and groups from 34 unconnected hominincollection sites around North America”(Laursen 17) forcomparison with their samples.Inthis regard, it is apparent that thecreature exists (Zahn1671).

DoctorMelba Ketchum and a group of other researchers released a picture ofa female Sasquatchsleeping,and they managed to extract some tissue from it for analysis.They also presented some bloody tissue that genetic scientistsconfirmed to be true by establishing that they had human-likemitochondria. She said that the tissuelooked like it “originatedfrom modern human females”(Zahn 1671)but instead from the Bigfoot upon analysis. Again, the creature wasin slumber,and they did not want to disrupt its sleep so that they can getproof enough for those who doubt this fact. Therefore, the physicalevidence that they presented is real and believable (Zahn1671). As an appeal tothe people to stop hunting Bigfoots, Doctor Ketchum says that “Thewhole point is that these are a sort of persons and they do haveculture, and there is sufficient evidence of this effect….theyshould have rights like we have”(Zahn 1671).

Amongthe most convincingproofof Bigfoot’sexistence is the recording of sounds.Sierra Soundsis a companythat distributes a compact disc under that narration of JonathanFlakes. The disc contains vocalizations between families of Bigfoots.They are howls, growls,and grunts. Again, there are testimonials from Nancy Logan claimingthat the tapes are not hoaxes but the realityof the sounds of these creatures. Moreover, she asserts that thosesounds cannot bemade by someoneconsidering their uniquepitches (Laursen 17).Jonathan Flakes isconvinced bysaying “the soundsweremade by Bigfoot” (Laursen 17).As a suggestion, she says that the sounds show the complexity andpossible profanities of the Bigfoots.

Furthermore,the sounds werecaptured from anairplane that approached the territory of the Sasquatches(Laursen 17).As such, they were responding to a potential threat to their lives,through the “swearwords” (Zahn 1671)in their unique language. In this regard, the sounds are believed tohave demystified the uncertainties that have beenpostulated bymany people who do not believe that these creatures exist in reality.Upon evaluation of the sounds by Krantz and other scientists, theyestablished the authenticity of the tapes. He said that “Thescientific community doesn’t know what to do with this new find. Icall it the Galileo effect”(Laursen 17) toconfirm the need to utilize this evidence. In no way is a human ableto make such a noise, no matter the manipulations with the handaround the mouth. Therefore, no further evidence is needed to provethe fact. Additionally, the Patterson-Gimlinsound recording of a walking Bigfoot was clearbecause they were able to capture a motion of the same event. Assuch, there is no much doubt about the elimination of uncertaintyin these recordings (Laursen17).

In conclusion, Bigfootis a creature that has attracted doubtfulaccounts in a move tofully comprehend the facts around its existence.It is a big and tall creature thought to inhabit forests of NorthAmerica deriving its name from the large limbs it uses forlocomotion. Evidence for its existence is plenty. The physical,visual, and eyewitness narrations have helped understand the realityabout them. Some scientists have analyzed hairs from the creaturepeople have recorded sounds, and others have directly encounteredthese monsters. With all these, one can only understand that indeed,Bigfootexists.

References

&quotBigfoot.The Yeti And Sasquatch In Myth And Reality&quot.&nbspJournalof Human Evolution&nbsp6.6(2016): 583. Web.

Laursen,Lucas. &quotThe Real Bigfoot&quot.&nbspScientificAmerican&nbsp310.1(2013): 17-17. Web.

Ravalli,Richard. &quotBigfoot: The Life And Times Of A Legend By Joshua BluBuhs And Anatomy Of A Beast: Obsession And Myth On The Trail OfBigfoot By Michael Mcleod&quot.&nbspTheJournal of American Culture&nbsp32.4(2012): 345-346. Web.

Zahn, L.M. &quotGENETICS: Finding Bigfoot&quot.&nbspScience&nbsp316.5832(2015): 1671b-1671b. Web.

Subject

  • Uncategorized

TheTheme of Food in “Invisible Man”

Throughoutthe novel, “Invisible Man,” the author has incorporated theconcept of food in various events to influence the reader’sinterpretation. The novel is about a black man who is struggling toarrive at conception with his true self. Nevertheless, it is a taskthat has proved difficult because he lives in a society where blackpeople face extensive discrimination. As the story progresses, thenarrator passes through different social groups that hold differentideas about blacks and their position in the society. In thebrotherhood, he is influenced to conceal his true self nevertheless,he eventually discovers the importance of his identity and is notcompelled to hide it. For instance, he publicly shows his love forparticular foods that identify him with Southern blacks. Even thoughfood is a common item, Ralph Ellison has given food an in-depthmeaning, and its encounter with the narrator represents acceptance ofhis heritage.

AsChapter 13 begins, the narrator is troubled as he does not have ajob, cash, or identity. As he walks along the streets, he meets a manselling yams, and this instance is significance in his journey ofself-acceptance. He buys the yam and enjoys eating it. As compared tothe past, he is no longer tempted to hide his true identity byavoiding various foods. If the narrator encountered a yam vendorearlier in his life, he would have avoided him. Things have changed,and his actions are not limited by how people will view him thus, hereturned to the vendor and purchased two more yams. He states

“Itwas exhilarating. I no longer had to worry about who saw me or aboutwhat was proper… to hell with being ashamed of what you liked. Nomore of that for me” (Ellison 262).

Thenarrator’s willingness to purchase the yams and eat them publiclyportrays acceptance of his Southern past. He is no longer afraid ofbeing categorized as a Southerner, and this the instance isimportance in his pursuit for self-realization. The narrator says“They’re my birthmark… I yam what I eat” (Ellison 266). Thisstatement reveals that yams are part of the narrator’s Southernculture, which he has fully embraced. After purchasing the yams forthe second time, he reflects on his life and accepts the changes thathad occurred because of his choices. Even though the last yam was notgood tasting because it was frostbitten, it had a significantmeaning. Just like the frostbitten yam, his life may have appeared assatisfactory from the outside however, he was experiencing manyinternal battles.

Thisinstance was the first reminder of his Southern identity. He agreesthat yams make his miss his place of origin and more confident abouthis true self. He states

“Isaw an old man warming his hands against the sides of an old lookingwagon… the odor of the baking yams slowly to me, bringing a stab ofthe swift nostalgia.” (Ellison 262).

Thenarrator had not eaten yams for many years, and he had forgotten howtasty they were. He had abandoned yams just like he did to hisidentity. Previously, the narrator was presented as a compliantindividual who was willing to submit to various social demands.Nevertheless, after eating the yams, he feels overly excited and evenplans on humiliating Bledsoe. He says that he felt “overcome by anintense feeling of freedom” after eating the yam. 264. He describesDr. Bledsoe as “a shameless chitterlings eater,” and this attackindicates that the narrator had realized that the Southern history ispart of his identity. The foods represent a Southern heritage, andthe narrator is displeased by Bledsoe because he is trying to play a&quotNegro.&quot Bledsoe is the principal of the college that thenarrator attended. Previously, Br. Bledsoe had described the narratorusing insulting words that degrade blacks, and later expelled himfrom school. Bledsoe is a black man, and the narrator does notunderstand why he has such a strong racist attitude. The narratorbelieves that there is nothing wrong with eating the food that aperson likes nevertheless, he feels that Bledsoe is a hypocrite whoeats the Southern foods to fake inferiority. It is undeniable thatthe narrator’s encounter with the yam vendor was a critical pointin his journey of discovering his true identity.

Ina different instance, food is used to show how the narrator tried toadopt the way of life of the whites, but could not escape hisidentity. For instance

“Thegood white bread of breakfast the rolls dripping with yellow butterthat I had slipped into my pocket so often to be munched later in myroom with wild blackberry jam from home” (Ellison 136).

Thispassage shows the extent at which the narrator is trying to fit inthe white society. He is using his traditional blackberry jamtogether with the white loaf that is viewed as acceptable. In Otherinstances represent ways in which the narrator tried to conform tothe white society. For example, he refuses to take the cultural mealof pork chops and grits to drink juice (Ellison178). At this point,the narrator is determined to abandon his Southern identity and leada white lifestyle.

Ina different case, the narrator is recommended for a job by Bledsoeafter he is expelled from the learning institution. A white man likeda speech that the narrator had previously given after he encounteredan old couple facing forceful eviction, and wishes to give thenarrator the job of delivering speeches in his company. Nevertheless,the narrator is unwilling, and the white man questions why he seemedundecided, yet he is an expert. The man purchases some cheesecake andcoffee for the narrator. This food has significance in this context.Cheesecake is soft while coffee has a bitter taste. Thus, coffee mayhave been used to represent a black man who leads a difficult life.From previous instances, Bledsoe is a racist even though he is alsoblack and he buys the narrator to represent his black identity.

Later,the narrator visits Mary’s house. Mary is a tough black lady whohas acquired the tactics of surviving different forms ofdiscrimination and oppression in the region. She is originally fromthe South, and she is kind and generous to the narrator. Mary viewsthe narrator as someone who needs her assistance and is determined tohelp him regain his health. She cooks for the narrator nevertheless,the narrator is dissatisfied with her choice of food. Mary`s food isa regular cabbage meal, which may reveal the level at which she triesto conform to the white society. She wants to forget her Southernpast and assimilate into the white culture just like it was the casefor the narrator at some point in his life. Moreover, cabbage in thiscontext signifies a life of poverty. As the narrator leaves, hediscovers that Mary leads a miserable and filthy life. As he leaves,the narrator hopes that Mary will endure because he has also beenthrough the same experience with his black friends (Ellison 323).Therefore, the cabbage meal reminds the narrator of his pastencounters and identity as a black.

Throughoutthe novel, the theme of food plays a vital role in revealingimportant aspects about the identity of the narrator. Yams play animportant part in the story as they are a symbol of the narrator’sSouthern past. The narrator enjoys the yams with homesickness, whichindicates that he is not ashamed of his Southern identity. He deniesthe urge to conform to the white way of life suppressing his desirefor the foods he likes. The whole of his life, the narrator, had beenmade to believe that various things such as yams are a representationof black inferiority. This moment is life changing, and he beginsembracing his heritage and true identity. Other aspects that arerepresentative of the narrator’s identity include chitterlings,blackberry jam, coffee, and cabbage. Coffee represents his blackoriginality while cabbage signifies the difficulties that thenarrator had experienced with other blacks. The narrator’sencounter with food represent defining moments in the novel and havehelped to gain an in-depth meaning of the author’s work.

WorkCited

Ellison,Ralph. Invisibleman.New York, NY: Random House, 1952.