Tobacco in the Philippines

  • Uncategorized

Tobaccoin the Philippines

Tobaccoin the Philippines

Identifythe public health focus of the article and conduct research on thattopic. In the paper address the relevance of this topic and globalimplications.

Tobaccocauses devastating harm to the health, treasury, and the overallspirit of the Philippine citizens. It is unfortunate that more than505600 children and 15570000 adults still consume the drug globallydespite evidence from health records showing that 71850 people diefrom tobacco-related diseases annually. Psychological experts explainthat this scenario is attributed to complacency where the drugaddicts are satisfied by the temporary pleasures while ignoring thepotential long-term risks (Sreeramareddyet al., 2014).This paper therefore addresses the relevance and global implicationsof tobacco use in Philippine and other forms of drug abuse.

Tobaccocan be consumed in different ways like sniffing and smoking.Unfortunately, none of the methods is safe for human health. As amatter of fact, all the styles are quite addictive and causes healthrelated problems to the user due to the presence of nicotine. Thedifferent forms include chewing the smokeless tobacco, E-cigarettewhich deliver nicotine directly to the system, smoking cigars, hookahpipes and Little cigars. Results from medical researchers how thatconsumption of tobacco harms almost every single organ of the. Worsestill, it causes many diseases which eventually destroys the healthof the smoker.

GlobalImpacts

Healthfatalities resulting from both first-hand and secondary smoking oftobacco are on the rise globally. Therefore, (Gilmore2015)stresses that it is important to address urgent measures to curb thetrend that is continuously gaining popularity among all peers in thesociety, both young and old. The side effects of tobacco do not occurinstantly but many years later after the user has started. It is dueto this factor that most of the developing nations are yet toexperience the full impact of tobacco effects unlike the wealthiercountries.

Thetobacco industry is fast growing in the low-income nations because ofthe high population coupled with the high addiction rates, social andeconomic stress. It is estimated that these countries will experiencehigh mortality from tobacco by 2030 (Jhaand Peto 2014).Earlier on, large scale smoking was controlled by moral factors inthe society. Unfortunately, advertisements, promotions, andsponsorships have weakened the social ethics which deterred women andchildren from smoking.

Thetobacco industry may claim to be creating jobs and generate revenuesthat promote both national and international development, but on thecontrary, the losses it causes are overwhelming to any nation.Tobacco use is currently causing the world billions of dollars intreating and caring for the patients each year (Printz2015).For instance, deaths resulting from tobacco use leads to losteconomic opportunities in the respective nations and the globaleconomy. These losses will worsen as the tobacco epidemic becomessevere because the deaths occur in the prime and productive years ofan individual.

Inconclusion, the rate of using tobacco is higher among the poor peoplethan it is to the richer folks. In regards to the countries, tobaccoconsumption is highest in the geographical regions where the annualaverage income is lowest. The outcome is a redirection of thenational funds to treating and caring for survivors instead ofdeveloping the country. While the industries target is to get morecustomers through addiction, the worst economic effect of tobacco iselevating the poverty levels.

References

Gilmore,A. B., Fooks, G., Drope, J., Bialous, S. A., &amp Jackson, R. R.(2015). Exposing and

addressingtobacco industry conduct in low-income and middle-incomecountries.&nbspThe

Lancet,&nbsp385(9972),1029-1043.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140673615603129

Jha,P., &amp Peto, R. (2014). Global effects of smoking, of quitting,and of taxing tobacco.&nbspNew

EnglandJournal of Medicine,&nbsp370(1),60-68.

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmra1308383

Printz,C. (2015). Gates, Bloomberg establish a fund to fight tobaccoindustry worldwide: Effort

aimsto assist low‐incomecountries.&nbspCancer,&nbsp121(14),2291-2292.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cncr.28998/full

Sreeramareddy,C. T., Pradhan, P. M. S., Mir, I. A., &amp Sin, S. (2014). Smokingand smokeless

tobaccouse in nine South and Southeast Asian countries: prevalence estimatesand social

determinantsfrom Demographic and Health Surveys.&nbspPopulationhealth metrics,&nbsp12(1),

22.https://pophealthmetrics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12963-014-0022-0

Tobacco in the Philippines

  • Uncategorized

Tobaccoin the Philippines

Tobaccoin the Philippines

Identifythe public health focus of the article and conduct research on thattopic. In the paper address the relevance of this topic and globalimplications.

Tobaccocauses devastating harm to the health, treasury, and the overallspirit of the Philippine citizens. It is unfortunate that more than505600 children and 15570000 adults still consume the drug globallydespite evidence from health records showing that 71850 people diefrom tobacco-related diseases annually. Psychological experts explainthat this scenario is attributed to complacency where the drugaddicts are satisfied by the temporary pleasures while ignoring thepotential long-term risks (Sreeramareddyet al., 2014).This paper therefore addresses the relevance and global implicationsof tobacco use in Philippine and other forms of drug abuse.

Tobaccocan be consumed in different ways like sniffing and smoking.Unfortunately, none of the methods is safe for human health. As amatter of fact, all the styles are quite addictive and causes healthrelated problems to the user due to the presence of nicotine. Thedifferent forms include chewing the smokeless tobacco, E-cigarettewhich deliver nicotine directly to the system, smoking cigars, hookahpipes and Little cigars. Results from medical researchers how thatconsumption of tobacco harms almost every single organ of the. Worsestill, it causes many diseases which eventually destroys the healthof the smoker.

GlobalImpacts

Healthfatalities resulting from both first-hand and secondary smoking oftobacco are on the rise globally. Therefore, (Gilmore2015)stresses that it is important to address urgent measures to curb thetrend that is continuously gaining popularity among all peers in thesociety, both young and old. The side effects of tobacco do not occurinstantly but many years later after the user has started. It is dueto this factor that most of the developing nations are yet toexperience the full impact of tobacco effects unlike the wealthiercountries.

Thetobacco industry is fast growing in the low-income nations because ofthe high population coupled with the high addiction rates, social andeconomic stress. It is estimated that these countries will experiencehigh mortality from tobacco by 2030 (Jhaand Peto 2014).Earlier on, large scale smoking was controlled by moral factors inthe society. Unfortunately, advertisements, promotions, andsponsorships have weakened the social ethics which deterred women andchildren from smoking.

Thetobacco industry may claim to be creating jobs and generate revenuesthat promote both national and international development, but on thecontrary, the losses it causes are overwhelming to any nation.Tobacco use is currently causing the world billions of dollars intreating and caring for the patients each year (Printz2015).For instance, deaths resulting from tobacco use leads to losteconomic opportunities in the respective nations and the globaleconomy. These losses will worsen as the tobacco epidemic becomessevere because the deaths occur in the prime and productive years ofan individual.

Inconclusion, the rate of using tobacco is higher among the poor peoplethan it is to the richer folks. In regards to the countries, tobaccoconsumption is highest in the geographical regions where the annualaverage income is lowest. The outcome is a redirection of thenational funds to treating and caring for survivors instead ofdeveloping the country. While the industries target is to get morecustomers through addiction, the worst economic effect of tobacco iselevating the poverty levels.

References

Gilmore,A. B., Fooks, G., Drope, J., Bialous, S. A., &amp Jackson, R. R.(2015). Exposing and

addressingtobacco industry conduct in low-income and middle-incomecountries.&nbspThe

Lancet,&nbsp385(9972),1029-1043.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140673615603129

Jha,P., &amp Peto, R. (2014). Global effects of smoking, of quitting,and of taxing tobacco.&nbspNew

EnglandJournal of Medicine,&nbsp370(1),60-68.

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmra1308383

Printz,C. (2015). Gates, Bloomberg establish a fund to fight tobaccoindustry worldwide: Effort

aimsto assist low‐incomecountries.&nbspCancer,&nbsp121(14),2291-2292.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cncr.28998/full

Sreeramareddy,C. T., Pradhan, P. M. S., Mir, I. A., &amp Sin, S. (2014). Smokingand smokeless

tobaccouse in nine South and Southeast Asian countries: prevalence estimatesand social

determinantsfrom Demographic and Health Surveys.&nbspPopulationhealth metrics,&nbsp12(1),

22.https://pophealthmetrics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12963-014-0022-0