What Changed in Perspectives

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WhatChanged in Perspectives

Inthe health care system, the advanced practice nursing and the familypsychiatric nurse practitioners play critical roles in helping thepatients manage most of the disorders, which they suffer from. Thefamily nurses apply their skills in different ways to help thepatients directly whenever they are in need of their services. Theirwork in hospitals includes treating and healing the patients withphysical ailments. Similarly, the family psychiatric nursepractitioner deal with the patients who have the mental disorders.The level of education and most of the tasks they are involved in isalmost the same. However, when switching from family medicine nursepractitioner to the family psychiatric nurse practitioner (FPNP),there are changed views that one must expect. It is imperative toaddress these changed perspectives brought about by the shifting fromfamily medicine nurse practitioner to family psychiatric nurse.

Whenswitching to the family psychiatric nurse practitioner, the aspectsthat change are mainly how the services are delivered to the patientsand the roles. Handling the patients with mental disorders ischallenging and unique compared to the general illness where thenurses are better in. The FPNPs extend their services beyond thephysical diseases to deal with patients ranging from pediatric togeriatric. From the perspective of patient population, it isdependent on the environment the psychiatric is working on. Forinstance, they are likely to take care of the needs of adult patientswith acute mental health disorders if they deliver their services toa mental health unit. However, if the facility deals with a specificmental health treatment, they will deal with managing that chronicmental disorder. Working with patients of every category is possible.

Theclinical environment of the FPNP changes as the psychiatric disordersare comorbid of other physical diseases. They are not confined towork in a mental health unit only but can extend their services tothe fully dedicated psychiatric health centers. Some prefer workingindependently while taking duties on other facilities on a part-timebasis. The opportunities for them are numerous, and they decide thebest hours for the work. The typical daily activities also changeonce the family nurse decides to transform to the psychiatric nurse.Besides prescribing medications, they can help in the management ofmedicine concerning the psychiatric and physical well-being. If thehospital has insufficient psychiatric staff, it means the time theyhave with patients is limited, and they should emphasize on ensuringthat the medication they give serves the intended purpose. Therefore,apart from doing the mental health assessment, the physical one isalso part of their duties.

Thedaily physical requirements and emotional considerations also changedepending on the clinical setting. In an outpatient community, theFPNP spend much of their time with those who seek their help. Thescenario changes in inpatient facilities as the patients includethose seeking treatment and the ones forcibly there through theirfamilies or law. To practice as a psychiatric, the nurse must fulfillthe conditions set by the American Nurses Credentialing Center whooffer the required credentials. The FPNP will also be required toregister with the relevant professional organizations to enjoy thebenefits of their profession.

Inconclusion, perspectives change significantly when the familymedicine nurse practitioner shift to the FPNP. This is dependent onphysical and emotional considerations of a clinical setting. Theroles performed by the members of the two practitioners as well asthe places of delivery of their services may experience some changesnevertheless, there are other aspects that remain common between thetwo.

What Changed in Perspectives?

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WhatChanged in Perspectives?

Author’sname

WhatChanged in Perspectives?

Thefamily psychiatric nurse practitioner has been resourceful inassisting the family change perspectives. One of the family membersby the name Brian is suffering from depression and anxiety as aresult of mental illness that occurred alongside physical illness.Our last born daughter who is a teenager is suffering from stroke,and therefore depression was so prevalent. In most cases, stroke cancause early death. The essay tries to establish the changes thatoccurred after the adoption of the family psychiatric nursepractitioner.

Firstly,the psychiatric nurse provided health information that is crucial inself-esteem. Brian struggles with low self-esteem as a result of hiscurrent condition. The nurse pointed out that the biggest impacts onself-esteem are the thoughts[ CITATION Whe14 l 1033 ].Brian used to battle with community prejudgment. He used to thinkthat the community judges him becauseof his condition. The nurse assisted Brian to cope up with hisbehavior and attitude of respect and managed to help Brian regaindignity and worth. He no longer struggles with community prejudgment.Brian has totally changed his perspective concerning how thecommunity perceives him. The nurse made him realize that most of thetimes the community does think about an individual and that in mostcases the prejudgment thoughts occur within the mind of anindividual. Additionally, Brian was demoralized because his conditionwas not improving, losing friends, losing a job, and respect. Thenurse managed to assist Brian to find purpose and redirect his focus.Brian came to realize that his thinking can have an adverse impacthis behavior or feelings. Moreover, Brian is now more aware ofnegative thinking, able to view more challenging issues more vividlyand respond more efficiently.

However,the nurse also pointed out that Brian, who is our last born, cancontrol his thoughts. For instance, the nurse emphasized that ifBrian focuses so much on his flaws or weaknesses, then he can learnto develop a more accurate, balanced view of himself. Brian has alsolost weight as a result of depression and stress. The nurse hasprovided relevant information that is helpful to Brian, and thusBrian has changed his perspective about self-esteem and is now seeingthe purpose and value of exercise, weight, adequate nutrition, work,sleep, and relaxation. Brian is also suffering from depression as aresult of the stroke. The nurse has employed emotional and physicalstrategies in assisting Brian to deal with depression and hasenhanced his ability to function adequately. Initially, Brian wasexpressing agitation, anxiety, hopelessness, and lack ofconcentration. The family is now aware of stroke and how best anindividual can treat it. Additionally, the nurse educated the familyabout the symptoms of stroke and the associated risk factors.Initially, Brian and the family were not aware of the signs of strokeand the strategies to cope up with stressful life accompanying thestroke.

Conclusion

Atsome point, Brian also contemplated suicide although the nurse wasable to screen such sensitive area of concern and as a result, Brianis more aware that agitation and anxiety could lead to suicide. Thefamily is more aware of the symptoms and the risk factors of strokeand has the right training to cope up with Brian’s needs. Brian isnow more aware of negative thinking, able to view more challengingissues more vividly and respond more efficiently. He also realizedthat most of the times the community does think about an individualand also prejudgment thoughts occur within the mind of an individual.

Reference

Wheeler,K. (2014). Psychotherapy for the Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nurse,Second Edition. New York: Springer Publishing Company.

What Changed in Perspectives

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WhatChanged in Perspectives

Intoday’s health system practice, nurses play a very crucial role inthe management of patients suffering from different conditions. Thishas necessitated the need for specialized practice in the nursingsector. Among those specializations are the family nurse medicinepractitioners and the family psychiatrist nurse practitioners. Whileboth a family medicine nurse practitioner and a family psychiatristnurse practitioners work in near similar conditions, their roles andmode of patient management differ a lot. Family nurse practitioners,commonly abbreviated as FNP are a group of specialized nurses who aretrained to offer normal clinical services in a community or familysetting. Family psychiatrist nurse practitioners (FPNP), on theother, hand help in the management of individuals suffering frommental disturbances in the community or at the family level. Due tosimilarities in their working environment, the two different groupsundergo near similar training in preparation for the practice.However, when switching from family medicine nurse practitioner to afamily psychiatric nurse practitioner (FPNP), there are changed viewsthat one must expect. While I previously worked as a family medicinenurse practitioner, the switch to a psychiatrist role needed a changein perspective on how I viewed the different roles in order to servethe patients well.

WhileI had undergone the training required to work as a familypsychiatrist nurse, practicing came with its challenges especially mylack of prior experience in dealing with people with mentaldisorders. While practicing as family medicine nurse, interactingwith the patient and enquiring from them on how they feel wascritical in determining the mode of treatment to apply. Contrary tothis, information from the mentally disable is in most occasionsunreliable. While this at first seemed challenging, it allowed me tobroaden my experience in dealing with these disorders. The switchgave me an opportunity to think critically and creatively aboutproviding solutions to people with mental disorders. When at first Ialways wondered how to get the correct diagnosis without asking thepatient some basic question, the chance of working with mentallydisable gave me an opportunity to think creatively and coming up withthose solutions.

Beforeswitching to psychiatrist practice, I always considered individualssuffering from mental disorders as unstable and violent. While thisis true to some extent, it’s not until the switch that I realizedpatient with such behaviors constituted a very small percentage. Themajorities of the patients were calm and required no restrainingwhile attending to them. In cases where one turns to be violent, Ialways take pride in offering the intervention that in mostsituations result in the desired outcome.

Inmy career as an FNP, I always viewed the psychiatric practice asisolated and boring. However, it’s not until the switch that Irealized how multi-disciplinary and fun it was. Working together withpsychiatrists, psychologists, occupational therapists, generalpractitioners, social workers and other health professionals’proved more interesting and offered an opportunity for careerdevelopment than I earlier thought.

Thekey to changing my perspective of the psychiatrist nursing practicehas been the invaluable lessons I have learned since I switched froma family nurse practitioner. Working in the psychiatrist field hastaught me how to evaluate patients to check for signs of tension andnervousness. The ability to remain calm, think fast and critically inchallenging conditions has been one of my biggest lessons. While Ipreviously viewed the tasks of a psychiatrist nurse as mundane andchallenging, the switch to the practice has presented me with anopportunity to develop personally while at the same time changing thesocial stigma associated with mental disability.